What Is Plantar Fasciitis?

Plantar fasciitis causes pain in the bottom of the heel. The plantar fascia is a thin, web-like ligament that connects your heel to the front of your foot. It supports the arch of your foot and helps you walk.

Plantar fasciitis is one of the most common orthopedic complaints. Your plantar fascia ligaments experience a lot of wear and tear in your daily life. Normally, these ligaments act as shock absorbers, supporting the arch of the foot. Too much pressure on your feet can damage or tear the ligaments. The plantar fascia becomes inflamed, and the inflammation causes heel pain and stiffness.

You just know something just isn’t right when you wake up every morning dreading those first steps getting out of your bed. The pain is sharp. The pain is real. The pain is instant. Slowly, as you take a few more steps you find some relief only to go through it all again each and every time you get up from a sitting position.

You’ve got plantar fasciitis and it is not fun. Plantar fasciitis heel brings over one million people per year to a doctor or chiropractor for relief. While it is often associated with certain sports, plantar fasciitis heel pain is not influenced by gender, nor is it exclusively an athlete’s problem. Sedentary folks find themselves with plantar fasciitis as well

Plantar fasciitis is a painful condition caused by inflammation of the thick, fibrous band of tissue (”fascia”) that reaches from the heel to the toes. This fascia is responsible for supporting the muscles and arch of the foot. The plantar fascia is made of three distinct parts: medial, central, and lateral bands. The central band is the thickest and strongest and is most likely involved in plantar fasciitis pain. Tiny tears are created on the surface of the fascia when it’s stretched too far causing inflammation and pain. In addition to inflammation and pain, the stress on the muscles and ligaments from plantar fasciitis can cause heel spurs. There isn’t a single treatment for plantar fasciitis, but physical therapy utilizes several tools which can alleviate the pain and inflammation.

What Causes Plantar Fasciitis?

Repeated small injuries to the fascia (with or without inflammation) are thought to be the cause of plantar fasciitis. The injury is usually near to where the plantar fascia attaches to your heel bone.

You are more likely to injure your plantar fascia in certain situations. For example:

If you are on your feet for a lot of the time, or if you do lots of walking, running, standing, etc, when you are not used to it or have previously had a more sedentary lifestyle.
If you have recently started exercising on a different surface – for example, running on the road instead of a track.
If you have been wearing shoes with poor cushioning or poor arch support.
If you are overweight – this will put extra strain on your heel.
If there is overuse or sudden stretching of your sole. For example – athletes who increase running intensity or distance; poor technique starting ‘off the blocks’, etc.
If you have a tight Achilles tendon (the big tendon at the bottom of your calf muscles above your heel). This can affect your ability to flex your ankle and make you more likely to damage your plantar fascia.

Treatment

plantar-fascitis-cure

Stretching is the best treatment for plantar fasciitis. It may help to try to keep weight off your foot until the initial inflammation goes away. You can also apply ice to the sore area for 20 minutes three or four times a day to relieve your symptoms. Often a doctor will prescribe a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medication such as ibuprofen or naproxen. Home exercises to stretch your Achilles tendon and plantar fascia are the mainstay of treatment and reduce the chance of recurrence.

Anti-inflammatory medication

Sports podiatrists should be cautioned against over-aggressive use of anti-inflammatories in treating the athlete.While it is tempting to utilize corticosteroid injections to expedite healing, athletes are often skeptical of receiving this treatment and are certainly at greater risk for sequela of over-ambitious use of steroid injections.There are reports in the literature of athletes undergoing spontaneous rupture of the plantar fascia after even single injections of their plantar fascia with corticosteroid.The conservative, biomechanical interventions outlined above should be implemented before considering provillus reviews.

CONCLUSION:

Athletes presenting with plantar fascitis must be treated aggressively because they have immediate needs and long-range goals that are different than those seen in the average sedentary patient with heel pain.It is important to be aggressive and employ a variety of modalities and treatments when formulating a treatment plan for the athlete.At the same time, caution should be made about the overzealous use of quick fixes, including corticosteroid injections because of the potential deleterious effect on athlete.

The cornerstone of plantar fascitis treatment for the athlete is biomechanical.Podiatric practitioners possess the greatest skill set and knowledge available in medicine today to adequately address the teds woodworking plans of plantar fascia overload.The use of properly casted and designed custom foot orthoses should be the cornerstone of non-surgical treatment of subcalcaneal pain in the athlete.

Leave a Reply

*